/files/images/authors/picture/bess-truman_quotes.png

Bess Truman - Quotes

There are 10 quotes by Bess Truman at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Bess Truman from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

Now about those ghosts. I'm sure they're here and I'm not half so alarmed at meeting up with any of them as I am at having to meet the live nuts I have to see every day. ---->>>

A woman's place in public is to sit beside her husband, be silent, and be sure her hat is on straight. ---->>>

I'm no different from anybody else. If I don't have a card, I can't check out these books. ---->>>

I've liked lots of people 'til I went on a picnic jaunt with them. ---->>>

I won't lock my doors or bar them either if any of the old coots in the pictures out in the hall want to come out of their frames for a friendly chat. ---->>>

You may invite the entire 35th Division to your wedding if you want to. I guess it's going to be yours as well as mine. We might as well have the church full while we are at it.

You may invite the entire 35th Division to your wedding if you want to. I guess it's going to be yours as well as mine. We might as well have the church full while we are at it.

I deplore any action which denies artistic talent an opportunity to express itself because of prejudice against race origin. ---->>>

It looks like you're going to have to put up with us for another four years. ---->>>

I have a strong tennis arm. ---->>>

It's nice to win. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: February 13, 1885
Birthplace:
Die: 10-18, 1982
Occupation: First Lady
Website:

Elizabeth Virginia "Bess" Truman (born Wallace; February 13, 1885 – October 18, 1982) was the wife of U.S. President Harry S. Truman and First Lady of the United States from 1945 to 1953. She had known her future husband since they were children attending the same school in Independence, Missouri. As First Lady, she did not enjoy the social and political scene in Washington, and at the end of her husband's term in 1953, she was relieved to return to Independence (wikipedia)