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Chick Hearn - Quotes

There are 8 quotes by Chick Hearn at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Chick Hearn from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

I always like to pretend two things: one, I'm sitting in the seat beside you watching the game together. I'll say, 'Wasn't that a great shot? Boy, it sure was.' The other thing I do is pretend I'm talking to people who are non-sighted. I try to create a word picture. I get more mail from blind people thanking me. ---->>>

Anybody who doesn't think I want the Lakers to win is a fool. But I'm no homer. ---->>>

I do something that I don't think anyone else does. I warm up before a game. Baseball and basketball players warm up, so why shouldn't the announcer warm up? ---->>>

You can't please everybody all the time, but you can please a majority. ---->>>

Most people can't talk as fast as I do. I'm not proud of that. That's God-given. ---->>>

My work is a love for me; I'd do it for free, but don't tell my bosses. ---->>>

I've got to be right on top of the action, or else all those people watching the game will say, 'This guy's not very good.' ---->>>

Radio is the art form of sports casting. If you're any good, you can do a great job on radio. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: 11-27, 1916
Birthplace: Aurora, Illinois, U.S.
Die: 08-05, 2002
Occupation: Journalist
Website:

Francis Dayle "Chick" Hearn (November 27, 1916 – August 5, 2002) was an American sportscaster. Known primarily as the long-time play-by-play announcer for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association, Hearn was remembered for his rapid fire, staccato broadcasting style, associated with colorful phrases such as slam dunk, air ball, and no harm, no foul that have become common basketball vernacular, and for broadcasting 3,338 consecutive Lakers games starting on November 21, 1965 (wikipedia)