Claude Bernard - Quotes

There are 13 quotes by Claude Bernard at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Claude Bernard from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

The experimenter who does not know what he is looking for will not understand what he finds.

The experimenter who does not know what he is looking for will not understand what he finds.

It is what we know already that often prevents us from learning.

It is what we know already that often prevents us from learning.

Put off your imagination, as you put off your overcoat, when you enter the laboratory. Put it on again, as you put on your overcoat, when you leave.

Put off your imagination, as you put off your overcoat, when you enter the laboratory. Put it on again, as you put on your overcoat, when you leave.

The true worth of an experimenter consists in his pursuing not only what he seeks in his experiment, but also what he did not seek. ---->>>

Man can learn nothing except by going from the known to the unknown. ---->>>

Observation is a passive science, experimentation an active science. ---->>>

A fact in itself is nothing. It is valuable only for the idea attached to it, or for the proof which it furnishes. ---->>>

Art is I; science is we.

Art is I; science is we.

Mediocre men often have the most acquired knowledge. ---->>>

The investigator should have a robust faith - and yet not believe. ---->>>

Science does not permit exceptions. ---->>>

In teaching man, experimental science results in lessening his pride more and more by proving to him every day that primary causes, like the objective reality of things, will be hidden from him forever and that he can only know relations. ---->>>

Experimentation is an active science. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: French
Born: July 12, 1813
Birthplace:
Die: February 10, 1878
Occupation: Scientist
Website:

Claude Bernard (French: [bɛʁnaʁ]; 12 July 1813 – 10 February 1878) was a French physiologist. Historian Ierome Bernard Cohen of Harvard University called Bernard "one of the greatest of all men of science". Among many other accomplishments, he was one of the first to suggest the use of blind experiments to ensure the objectivity of scientific observations (wikipedia)