Edward Teller - Quotes

There are 11 quotes by Edward Teller at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Edward Teller from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

The science of today is the technology of tomorrow.

The science of today is the technology of tomorrow.

Had we not pursued the hydrogen bomb, there is a very real threat that we would now all be speaking Russian. I have no regrets. ---->>>

A fact is a simple statement that everyone believes. It is innocent, unless found guilty. A hypothesis is a novel suggestion that no one wants to believe. It is guilty, until found effective.

A fact is a simple statement that everyone believes. It is innocent, unless found guilty. A hypothesis is a novel suggestion that no one wants to believe. It is guilty, until found effective.

Secrecy, once accepted, becomes an addiction. ---->>>

The main purpose of science is simplicity and as we understand more things, everything is becoming simpler. ---->>>

Life improves slowly and goes wrong fast, and only catastrophe is clearly visible. ---->>>

No endeavor that is worthwhile is simple in prospect; if it is right, it will be simple in retrospect. ---->>>

Physics is, hopefully, simple. Physicists are not. ---->>>

Two paradoxes are better than one; they may even suggest a solution. ---->>>

I tried to contribute to the defeat of the Soviets. If I contributed 1%, it is 1% of something enormous. ---->>>

My experience has been in a short 77 years that in the end when you fight for a desperate cause and have good reasons to fight, you usually win.

My experience has been in a short 77 years that in the end when you fight for a desperate cause and have good reasons to fight, you usually win.

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: 01-15, 1908
Birthplace:
Die: 09-09, 2003
Occupation: Physicist
Website:

Edward Teller (Hungarian: Teller Ede; January 15, 1908 – September 9, 2003) was a Hungarian-American theoretical physicist who was born in Hungary, and is known colloquially as "the father of the hydrogen bomb", although he claimed he did not care for the title. He made numerous contributions to nuclear and molecular physics, spectroscopy (in particular the Jahn–Teller and Renner–Teller effects), and surface physics (wikipedia)