Georg Simmel - Quotes

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The deepest problems of modern life derive from the claim of the individual to preserve the autonomy and individuality of his existence in the face of overwhelming social forces, of historical heritage, of external culture, and of the technique of life. ---->>>

For, to be a stranger is naturally a very positive relation; it is a specific form of interaction. ---->>>

The metropolis reveals itself as one of those great historical formations in which opposing streams which enclose life unfold, as well as join one another with equal right. ---->>>

Secrecy sets barriers between men, but at the same time offers the seductive temptation to break through the barriers by gossip or confession. ---->>>

Every relationship between two individuals or two groups will be characterized by the ratio of secrecy that is involved in it.

Every relationship between two individuals or two groups will be characterized by the ratio of secrecy that is involved in it.

The intellectually sophisticated person is indifferent to all genuine individuality, because relationships and reactions result from it which cannot be exhausted with logical operations. ---->>>

Discretion is nothing other than the sense of justice with respect to the sphere of the intimate contents of life. ---->>>

Secrecy involves a tension which, at the moment of revelation, finds its release. ---->>>

Man's nature, originally good and common to all, should develop unhampered. ---->>>

Every relationship between persons causes a picture of each to take form in the mind of the other, and this picture evidently is in reciprocal relationship with that personal relationship.

Every relationship between persons causes a picture of each to take form in the mind of the other, and this picture evidently is in reciprocal relationship with that personal relationship.

The psychological basis of the metropolitan type of individuality consists in the intensification of nervous stimulation which results from the swift and uninterrupted change of outer and inner stimuli. ---->>>

Modern culture is constantly growing more objective. Its tissues grow more and more out of impersonal energies, and absorb less and less the subjective entirety of the individual. ---->>>

The first internal relation that is essential to a secret society is the reciprocal confidence of its members. ---->>>

For the division of labor demands from the individual an ever more one-sided accomplishment, and the greatest advance in a one-sided pursuit only too frequently means dearth to the personality of the individual. ---->>>

For the metropolis presents the peculiar conditions which are revealed to us as the opportunities and the stimuli for the development of both these ways of allocating roles to men. ---->>>

In the latter case life rests upon a thousand presuppositions which the individual can never trace back to their origins, and verify; but which he must accept upon faith and belief. ---->>>

The individual has become a mere cog in an enormous organization of things and powers which tear from his hands all progress, spirituality, and value in order to transform them from their subjective form into the form of a purely objective life. ---->>>

Thus, the technique of metropolitan life is unimaginable without the most punctual integration of all activities and mutual relations into a stable and impersonal time schedule. ---->>>

Cities are, first of all, seats of the highest economic division of labor. ---->>>

The metropolis has always been the seat of the money economy. ---->>>

Every superior personality, and every superior performance, has, for the average of mankind, something mysterious. ---->>>

On the one hand, life is made infinitely easy for the personality in that stimulations, interests, uses of time and consciousness are offered to it from all sides. They carry the person as if in a stream, and one needs hardly to swim for oneself. ---->>>

For this reason, strangers are not really conceived as individuals, but as strangers of a particular type: the element of distance is no less general in regard to them than the element of nearness. ---->>>

The earliest phase of social formations found in historical as well as in contemporary social structures is this: a relatively small circle firmly closed against neighboring, strange, or in some way antagonistic circles. ---->>>

Secrecy is thus, so to speak, a transition stadium between being and not-being. ---->>>

In order to accommodate to change and to the contrast of phenomena, the intellect does not require any shocks and inner upheavals; it is only through such upheavals that the more conservative mind could accommodate to the metropolitan rhythm of events. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: German
Born: March 1, 1858
Birthplace: Berlin, Kingdom of Prussia
Die: 09-28, 1918
Occupation: Sociologist
Website:

Georg Simmel (German: [ˈzɪməl]; 1 March 1858 – 28 September 1918) was a German sociologist, philosopher, and critic. Simmel was one of the first generation of German sociologists: his neo-Kantian approach laid the foundations for sociological antipositivism, asking 'What is society?' in a direct allusion to Kant's question 'What is nature?', presenting pioneering analyses of social individuality and fragmentation (wikipedia)