Hannah Kent - Quotes

There are 19 quotes by Hannah Kent at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Hannah Kent from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

In Iceland, you can see the contours of the mountains wherever you go, and the swell of the hills, and always beyond that the horizon. And there's this strange thing: you're never sort of hidden; you always feel exposed in that landscape. But it makes it very beautiful as well. ---->>>

People speak of the fear of the blank canvas as though it is a temporary hesitation, a trembling moment of self-doubt. For me it was more like being abducted from my bed by a clown, thrust into a circus arena with a wicker chair, and told to tame a pissed-off lion in front of an expectant crowd. ---->>>

My dad would tell me bedtime stories, and he used to always leave them open-ended and finish at a crucial point with the words, 'dream on'. Then it was my responsibility to finish the story as I was drifting off to sleep. We would call them dreaming stories. ---->>>

You know you're going to have a good day when your morning begins with breakfast in the same room as Carrie Tiffany, David Vann and Lionel Shriver. ---->>>

I first heard the story of Agnes Magnusdottir when I was an exchange student in the north of Iceland. ---->>>

I have a deep and ongoing love of Iceland, particular the landscape, and when writing 'Burial Rites,' I was constantly trying to see whether I could distill its extraordinary and ineffable qualities into a kind of poetry. ---->>>

I applied for funding to embark on an overseas field trip in Iceland, and spent six weeks there happily holed up in the national archives, museums and libraries, sifting through ministerial and parish records, censuses, maps, microfilm, logs, and local histories. ---->>>

When I write, I write for myself, and I have high expectations... so I'm just trying to meet those. I'm not going to distract myself with other people's expectations. ---->>>

There are secrets at the heart of every story; there is something that must be uncovered or discovered, both by the reader and by the characters. ---->>>

I had an interest in Scandinavian countries because I'd never seen snow. ---->>>

I still don't know why, exactly, but I do think people can have a spiritual connection to landscape, and I certainly did in Iceland. ---->>>

Most writers are drawn to what is unknown, rather than what is clear in any tale. ---->>>

I don't like to pretend I was guided in any way by the supernatural world, but the more you talk about that, the easier it is to dismiss those notions. ---->>>

I was a very imaginative child, and my parents were very encouraging of that. My sister and I would put on plays; I would write my own stories. ---->>>

I always knew I wanted to be a writer. I just wasn't sure what I wanted to do as a money-making job. ---->>>

I really hate the term 'historical novel' - it reminds me of bodice-rippers. But I'm hooked on research, and I really, really enjoy it. ---->>>

I had expected that at some point during the first draft a light would go on, and I would understand, finally, how to write a book. This never happened. The process was akin to blindly walking in the dark, feeling my way only by touch, and only recognising dead ends when I smacked into them. ---->>>

I used to have 20/20 vision, believe it or not; that's gone because of all the reading I did when I wasn't supposed to, reading in the back of a car, waiting for each street light to go past so I could grab another sentence. ---->>>

The mystery at the center of 'Burial Rites' is not who killed whom on the night of March 13, 1828. It is the mystery each of us encounters: Can we every truly know another? Can we ever truly know ourselves? ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: Australian
Born: 06-21, 1985
Birthplace:
Die:
Occupation: Writer
Website:

Hannah Kent (born 1985) is an Australian writer. In 2011 she won the inaugural Writing Australia Unpublished Manuscript Award for her novel Burial Rites. Published in May 2013, it tells the story of Agnes Magnúsdóttir, a servant in northern Iceland who was condemned to death after the murder of two men, one of whom was her employer, and became the last woman put to death in Iceland (wikipedia)