Irma S. Rombauer - Quotes

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A pig resembles a saint in that he is more honored after death than during his lifetime. ---->>>

Most cocktails containing liquor are made today with gin and ingenuity. In brief, take an ample supply of the former and use your imagination. For the benefit of a minority, it is courteous to serve chilled fruit juice in addition to cocktails made with liquor.

Most cocktails containing liquor are made today with gin and ingenuity. In brief, take an ample supply of the former and use your imagination. For the benefit of a minority, it is courteous to serve chilled fruit juice in addition to cocktails made with liquor.

The new 'Joy' was needed for a number of reasons. Recent developments in nutrition and new ingredients were two of the major reasons for the revision. One of the other big reasons was America's new love for big flavors. Yay! ---->>>

I know who in the family is a great cook. I know where the great recipes are. ---->>>

The automatic bread maker is not as good as breads made by hand, but waking up to the smell of fresh bread is worth the price of admission. We use it for fresh cinnamon raisin toast - mmmmmmm! ---->>>

Custard puddings, sauces and fillings accompany the seven ages of man in sickness and in health. ---->>>

Soybeans really need an uplift, being on the dull side, but, like dull people, respond readily to the right contacts. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: October 30, 1877
Birthplace: St. Louis, Missouri
Die: 10-14, 1962
Occupation: Author
Website:

Irma Starkloff Rombauer (October 30, 1877 – October 14, 1962) was an American cookbook author, best known for The Joy of Cooking (1931), one of the world's most widely read cookbooks. Following Irma Rombauer's death, periodic revisions of the book were carried out by her daughter, Marion Rombauer Becker, and subsequently by Marion's son Ethan Becker (wikipedia)