Janis Ian - Quotes

There are 37 quotes by Janis Ian at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Janis Ian from this hand-picked collection about time, music, home. Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

At the end of the day, all you can hope for is to go on. The older I get, the more I realize that just keeping on keeping on is what life's all about.

At the end of the day, all you can hope for is to go on. The older I get, the more I realize that just keeping on keeping on is what life's all about.

The best thing you can learn from the worst times of your life is that it always gets better. It may take a month, a year, a decade, but it will get better if you leave yourself open to it.

The best thing you can learn from the worst times of your life is that it always gets better. It may take a month, a year, a decade, but it will get better if you leave yourself open to it.

Once you're halfway home, you know that you can probably get the rest of the way there. ---->>>

There will always be those people who are just backward and ignorant. There will always be those people. They need somebody to feel superior to. ---->>>

I learned the truth at seventeen, That love was meant for beauty queens, And high school girls with clear skinned smiles, Who married young and then retired. ---->>>

It seems to be part of the human condition to need someone you can look down on. I still don't get that one. ---->>>

It's neat to have finally reached a point where I can accept what I was and what I am. ---->>>

I started 'Society's Child' on a bus in East Orange as I was going home from school. I saw a black and white couple sitting there and started thinking about it.

I started 'Society's Child' on a bus in East Orange as I was going home from school. I saw a black and white couple sitting there and started thinking about it.

Artists are taught to be humble about their impact, especially in folk music. It's so ingrained that I have a hard time even thinking I had any impact other than what a normal hit song would have. ---->>>

I think these last 10 years have seen just a huge shift in the psyche of this country as regards gay people. I think AIDS had a lot to do with it. So many families who really believed they'd 'never met one' were suddenly confronted with their sons becoming ill, and friends of sons. I think that brought a lot of it into the open. ---->>>

It's what I do well - I write about things that make people uncomfortable. That's probably the only thing I do better than my peers. ---->>>

Some people would rather stay ignorant and self-satisfied. ---->>>

I feel I was born with the music coming to me, and that's not something to be wasted. ---->>>

That's an amazing moment, the first time you hear yourself on radio. It's still thrilling. ---->>>

A radio show recently did a beautiful eulogy of me. ---->>>

I bought all my friends guitars and I had a good time with my money. But then one day the IRS came knocking. ---->>>

I want to do some fiction writing, I've had some pretty good luck with short stories, I'd like to do a couple of larger things. ---->>>

When you're young, the goal is to have a hit. You get a little older and the goal becomes to get to make another record. ---->>>

At the end of the day, if you don't have a record contract, a studio or a guitar, you can still write songs. You're still an artist. That's something no one can take away. ---->>>

I see interracial couples all the time in Nashville. I'm a Jew in Nashville. I'm a gay person in Nashville. It's a non-issue in most of the time. That's a huge leap forward. ---->>>

I think one of the reasons musicians keep doing what they do and writers keep doing what they do, is that we're totally unsuited for anything else. And I for one am much too lazy. ---->>>

I had a vague idea of the song's impact in the '60s, but that was tempered by the hate mail and threats I was receiving. It was only about ten years ago, when I finally put it back in my show because so many people were asking for it, that I understood 'Society's Child' real impact. ---->>>

I think all of us thought that by the '70s, at the latest the '80s, all the world's problems would be solved and everyone would be getting along fine. And instead we saw that Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated that year, Robert F. Kennedy died. We saw that it was going to be a lot more difficult than I think we had thought. ---->>>

I was interviewed for a Grammy television show, and they asked me about Nashville, and I talked for three minutes and when I finished, I was teared up. The whole room was crying. Nashville has given me a home, where I never had a home before. ---->>>

I was one of I think three white girls in my school. So, I was very much an outsider. And plus I was Jewish and all of my friends were black and Baptist because they listen to the coolest music. We were all listening to Ray Charles and what was then called race music. ---->>>

Of course, I have a different vested interest in the gay community, because I am gay, and I would certainly enjoy the tax advantages that straight people have, and the inheritance advantages, and things like Social Security, but I've always been a civil rights advocate across the board. That's how I was raised. ---->>>

I gave guitar lessons. I tried to join bands. My mom always said it was obvious that nothing was going to stop me. ---->>>

My parents both were doing the Civil Rights Movement, were very involved with the civil rights to Congress. And my friends' parents were as well. ---->>>

Going off the road just leaves me more time to be a writer. ---->>>

I mean, I would love to have the career Joan Baez is having in Europe right now, but God knows I don't begrudge her that career. ---->>>

I played for anybody and everybody from the time I started playing guitar, when I was 10 or 11. ---->>>

I've always been an avid reader. If I don't have a book in the car, I'll stop and pick one up just to have something to read. I don't even remember learning to read. ---->>>

I know just enough Japanese to get by if I get lost and greet an audience properly, just from having a lot of Japanese friends and being there over the years. ---->>>

I think I grew up, stopped worrying about what people thought of me, and whether things were going to turn out OK. I'm concentrating on doing the best work I can do and letting it go at that. ---->>>

'Society's Child' was a real hard record to start with. That's all you want is for you to put your first record out and have people screaming at you in the streets. But it taught me right away that what I was doing was valuable and important. ---->>>

The money when you're having a hit is great, but money can be taken from you. What can't be taken from you is the talent and the effect your work has. ---->>>

When people used to call me a political writer, it was kind of confusing because I was always much more interested in the social end of things which hinges on the political, but it isn't really part of it. ---->>>

Biography

Name: Janis Ian
Nationality: American
Born: 04-07, 1951
Birthplace: in Bronx, The United States
Die:
Occupation: Musician

Janis Ian (born Janis Eddy Fink; April 7, 1951) is an American singer-songwriter who was most commercially successful in the 1960s and 1970s; her most widely recognized song, "At Seventeen", was released as a single from her 1975 album Between the Lines which reached number 1 on the Billboard chart. Born in 1951 in New York, Ian entered the American folk music scene while still a teenager in the mid-1960s (wikipedia)