John Gresham Machen - Quotes

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I'm so thankful for the active obedience of Christ. No hope without it.

I'm so thankful for the active obedience of Christ. No hope without it.

The great redemptive religion which has always been known as Christianity is battling against a totally diverse type of religious belief, which is only the more destructive of the Christian faith because it makes use of traditional Christian terminology. ---->>>

Conservative New Testament studies could also provide an intellectually satisfying alternative to German biblical criticism and to the liberal theology that accompanied it. ---->>>

Stay the course. ---->>>

Vastly more important than all questions with regard to methods of preaching is the root question as to what it is that shall be preached. ---->>>

In many respects, my work is very enjoyable, for I seem to get on pretty well with the fellows and enjoy the work of instruction as well as my own studies. ---->>>

I see with greater and greater clearness that consistent Christianity is the easiest Christianity to defend. ---->>>

The chief modern rival of Christianity is 'liberalism'... at every point, the two movements are in direct opposition. ---->>>

Afternoon classes - that evil invention! ---->>>

I can't die now, I have so much work to do. ---->>>

Modern culture is a tremendous force. ---->>>

What is the relation between Christianity and modern culture; may Christianity be maintained in a scientific age? It is this problem which modern liberalism attempts to solve. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: July 28, 1881
Birthplace: Baltimore, Maryland
Die: 01-01, 1937
Occupation: Theologian
Website:

John Gresham Machen (; July 28, 1881 – January 1, 1937) was an American Presbyterian theologian in the early 20th century. He was the Professor of New Testament at Princeton Seminary between 1906 and 1929, and led a conservative revolt against modernist theology at Princeton and formed Westminster Theological Seminary as a more orthodox alternative (wikipedia)