John McEnroe - Quotes

There are 33 quotes by John McEnroe at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by John McEnroe from this hand-picked collection about time. Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

The important thing is to learn a lesson every time you lose. Life is a learning process and you have to try to learn what's best for you. Let me tell you, life is not fun when you're banging your head against a brick wall all the time.

The important thing is to learn a lesson every time you lose. Life is a learning process and you have to try to learn what's best for you. Let me tell you, life is not fun when you're banging your head against a brick wall all the time.

I'll let the racket do the talking.

I'll let the racket do the talking.

The good part of having six kids is, there's always one who wants to hug you and say, 'Daddy, I love you.' ---->>>

Do you have any problems, other than that you're unemployed, a moron, and a dork? ---->>>

The greatest compliment I ever got was when people called me an artist, and I understand that solo aspect of being an artist, when you're in there by yourself, trying to do something great, and people who don't even know you can come up and just dump on you. ---->>>

No one cares about the Davis Cup. How many people know I won five Davis Cups and seven majors, but that I rarely played the Australian Open? ---->>>

Everybody loves success, but they hate successful people. ---->>>

What is the single most important quality in a tennis champion? I would have to say desire, staying in there and winning matches when you are not playing that well. ---->>>

Things slow down, the ball seems a lot bigger and you feel like you have more time. Everything computes - you have options, but you always take the right one. ---->>>

Believe it or not, I was a pretty shy youngster growing up. ---->>>

I believe there's only one autobiography you can do. ---->>>

The only thing 'championship' about Wimbledon is its prestige. ---->>>

This taught me a lesson, but I'm not quite sure what it is. ---->>>

I haven't seen a professional player come out of New York in over 20 years since my brother Patrick came out. Blake spent a few years in Harlem, but he moved to Connecticut when he was a kid. ---->>>

I think the players, I put in the book for example that we should go back to wood rackets, probably they laughed at me, I'm a dinosaur, but I think that you see these great players, have even more variety and you see more strategy, there'd be more subtlety. ---->>>

If, in a few months, I'm only number 8 or number 10 in the world, I'll have to look at what off-the-court work I can do. I will need to do something if I want to be number 1. ---->>>

I think it's the mark of a great player to be confident in tough situations. ---->>>

The older I get, the better I used to be. ---->>>

I'd like to be the commissioner of tennis, but do I want to get into politics? Sometimes I have delusions of grandeur that that would be an interesting, good thing. I'm talking about actual politics, like being a congressman, but then I see how unbelievably nasty it really is, and maybe I'm not quite knowledgeable enough to actually do it. ---->>>

There's something deeply satisfying when it succeeds, but I'm not going to do another book just to put my name on something and make some money if it's not something I deeply care about. ---->>>

It's one thing if you live in London and you're rooting for Chelsea or you're in New York and you love the Giants or Jets and no matter who's on the team you're into it. It's different in tennis; you're sort of your own guy, so you have to reach out and grab a person in a different way. ---->>>

Maybe I should have played two more Australians and two less Davis Cups? I could have had more majors and still have three Davis Cups when most people don't have one. ---->>>

But these guys learn so fast now, they sort of soak up the information, they're fearless. Those are the guys who learn from their mistakes and come back strong the next time. ---->>>

If Roger stopped right now and never won another match, to me he'd already be one of the greatest players to ever play the game. To me, he's the greatest all around talent that I've ever seen. ---->>>

I had a similar year back in 1984 when I felt like I couldn't lose. ---->>>

Well I think that's probably one of a few, where I grew up in the City of New York, it's got a lot of energy, my parents are Irish-American so there was a bit of yelling going on in my house but it seemed normal. ---->>>

When I was eight and a half, my parents moved to a part of Queens where there was a club nearby. We joined, and if you believe in someone up above, I think I was meant to play tennis. ---->>>

I'd like to think I could have and should have won more, but that's not the point. And I was at the point where I was playing great tennis in the mid 80s - the type of tennis people hadn't seen before - and I was very proud of that. ---->>>

I didn't serve and volley until I got to Wimbledon in '77. ---->>>

When I was 25, if you'd have said I was going to be a commentator, that would seem like, 'Oh, my God. That's a huge step down.' ---->>>

It means a lot to be back in New York. Particularly since one of the last senior event scheduled in the States was supposed to be here in New York. We were supposed to play in Central Park right after 9-11 and when 9-11 happened obviously things changed. ---->>>

To be involved in a senior tournament back in the States is very satisfying. ---->>>

We should reach out to people to try to go after the fans the way other sports do. Because we can't just depend on the fact that it is a great game. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: 02-16, 1959
Birthplace:
Die:
Occupation: Athlete
Website:

John Patrick McEnroe Jr. (born February 16, 1959) is a retired American tennis player, often considered among the greatest in the history of the sport. He was known for his shot-making artistry and volleying skills, as well as his confrontational on-court behavior that frequently landed him in trouble with umpires and tennis authorities (wikipedia)