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Loren Eiseley - Quotes

There are 10 quotes by Loren Eiseley at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Loren Eiseley from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

Every time we walk along a beach some ancient urge disturbs us so that we find ourselves shedding shoes and garments or scavenging among seaweed and whitened timbers like the homesick refugees of a long war.

Every time we walk along a beach some ancient urge disturbs us so that we find ourselves shedding shoes and garments or scavenging among seaweed and whitened timbers like the homesick refugees of a long war.

One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other than human. ---->>>

If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water. ---->>>

Man is always marveling at what he has blown apart, never at what the universe has put together, and this is his limitation. ---->>>

God knows how many things a man misses by becoming smug and assuming that matters will take their own course. ---->>>

One could not pluck a flower without troubling a star.

One could not pluck a flower without troubling a star.

Like the herd animals we are, we sniff warily at the strange one among us. ---->>>

When the human mind exists in the light of reason and no more than reason, we may say with absolute certainty that Man and all that made him will be in that instant gone. ---->>>

Tomorrow lurks in us, the latency to be all that was not achieved before. ---->>>

It is frequently the tragedy of the great artist, as it is of the great scientist, that he frightens the ordinary man.

It is frequently the tragedy of the great artist, as it is of the great scientist, that he frightens the ordinary man.

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: 09-03, 1907
Birthplace:
Die: 07-09, 1977
Occupation: Scientist
Website:

Loren Eiseley (September 3, 1907 – July 9, 1977) was an American anthropologist, educator, philosopher, and natural science writer, who taught and published books from the 1950s through the 1970s. He received many honorary degrees and was a fellow of multiple professional societies. At his death, he was Benjamin Franklin Professor of Anthropology and History of Science at the University of Pennsylvania (wikipedia)