Meg Rosoff - Quotes

There are 43 quotes by Meg Rosoff at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Meg Rosoff from this hand-picked collection about life. Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

Your writing voice is the deepest possible reflection of who you are. The job of your voice is not to seduce or flatter or make well-shaped sentences. In your voice, your readers should be able to hear the contents of your mind, your heart, your soul. ---->>>

Every day a piano doesn't fall on my head is good luck. ---->>>

Self-knowledge is essential not only to writing, but to doing almost anything really well. It allows you to work through from a deep place - from the deep, dark corners of your subconscious mind. ---->>>

My daughter is a fantastic travelling companion - she's totally organised, whereas I'm hopeless. ---->>>

While working in advertising, I channelled my creative energy into elaborate escape fantasies: cake making, dog breeding, the Peace Corps. ---->>>

I've spent most of my life trying to wear a persona that didn't quite fit and when I started writing books, it was like finally becoming the right person. ---->>>

There's an overwhelming sense of paranoia in the suburbs. People there seem so much more paranoid to me than people in the city about their kids being kidnapped or their parties being raided or their drinks being spiked. There's a kind of hysteria about that. ---->>>

I've been fired five times for having a bad attitude.

I've been fired five times for having a bad attitude.

The average attention span of the modern human being is about half as long as whatever you're trying to tell them. ---->>>

Teenagers are very dark, I think. That's all the goth and emo stuff. They're experiencing a lot of stuff that adults experience, but in a much more raw way. It's that extremity that I'm interested in, to be able to go down so far and come up so quickly.

Teenagers are very dark, I think. That's all the goth and emo stuff. They're experiencing a lot of stuff that adults experience, but in a much more raw way. It's that extremity that I'm interested in, to be able to go down so far and come up so quickly.

The truth about love is that you don't always fall in love with whom you are supposed to fall in love with. Love just hits you. It is a transcendent thing. Sometimes it is your best friend's husband and sometimes it's your father. It's weird. But that's a fact of life. ---->>>

When you read a book, the neurons in your brain fire overtime, deciding what the characters are wearing, how they're standing, and what it feels like the first time they kiss. No one shows you. The words make suggestions. Your brain paints the pictures. ---->>>

I think most people struggle over a matter of years to find a satisfying way to live. ---->>>

I loved horses and horse books as a child. ---->>>

Writing's a great skill, but thinking's a better one. ---->>>

As a person with the retentive mental capacity of a goldfish and a dislike of repetition, I frequently make use of the thesaurus built into my Microsoft Word U.K. Software. ---->>>

Contrary to popular belief, editors and agents are gagging for good books. ---->>>

My younger sister Debby had died of cancer, which started me writing - the sense of life being short. Cancer focuses your mind. ---->>>

I'd like to think life has improved since 1850, despite the long hours we all seem to spend slaving over hot computers, but the psychological journeys remain the same - the search for love, identity, a meaningful place in the world.

I'd like to think life has improved since 1850, despite the long hours we all seem to spend slaving over hot computers, but the psychological journeys remain the same - the search for love, identity, a meaningful place in the world.

When I was at university, there was such a strong delineation between city kids and those who had grown up the suburbs. City kids were so at home in the world, in a way that suburban kids take years to catch up, if indeed they ever can. ---->>>

The thing about adolescence is that you are emerging from a state of obscurity. You are coming out into the world from your family. Your family can seem normal because it is your family and all you know, but in fact it is a mess. ---->>>

I am quite a cheerful, dark person. On the outside, I'm optimistic but I expect the worst to happen. ---->>>

I know from experience that careers do not always arise from a deep sense of destiny. ---->>>

I think the bravest thing to write about is nothing, just to write a book in which nothing happens. ---->>>

I'm not sure I can write about America for the same reason I'm not sure I can write about adults - I have no critical distance on either place. ---->>>

I, a late riser, fantasise about getting up every morning at 5 A.M. to fetch the horses in from the fields. ---->>>

In the odd moment when I am not thinking about horses, I write books. ---->>>

Life doesn't go on forever, and you don't want to drop dead without ever having done what you wanted to do. ---->>>

Life is absolutely horrific, leading up to absolute horror. ---->>>

Although I've lived in England for more than twenty years, I still have a foreigner's passion for all the details of English history and rural life. ---->>>

I always think plot is what you fall back on if you can't write, to keep things going. ---->>>

I have never written out of a desire to be controversial. ---->>>

I lived in New York for 10 years, and every New Yorker sees a shrink. ---->>>

My husband is my most valuable resource. ---->>>

The more you live, the better writer you are. ---->>>

I can actually trace the moment I decided I couldn't be a doctor. It was in biology, they brought in these African crickets and we were supposed to dissect them - but there's no way I was touching those bugs. ---->>>

I'm constantly snatching my books out of the hands of precocious ten-year-olds who are simply too young to read them, despite parents insisting that dear Octavia has a reading age of 28. I remember trying to read 'In Cold Blood' at the age of twelve, and realising that just because you can read book doesn't mean you should. ---->>>

In my experience, adults rarely bother reading the reviews of children's books and almost never read the books themselves - particularly if they don't have children. ---->>>

It's hard recommending books for kids, and a huge responsibility. If you get it wrong, they don't tell you they hate that particular book, they tell you they hate reading. ---->>>

Like many other people of my generation, I don't think I ever really bothered to grow up. I wasn't ever really a proper teenager until I was about 19, and maybe I got a bit stuck there, because it seemed to go on and on. ---->>>

Nowadays, I only review books I really like. It's cowardly, I know, but I figure it's not my job to make people unhappy. I'll leave that to the professionals. ---->>>

One of the more interesting things I've learnt since becoming a writer is that if you like the book, you'll generally like the person. It doesn't always work in reverse - there are huge numbers of lovely people out there writing not very good books. ---->>>

People talk about writing convincing teenagers like it's a really clever thing to do, but it comes incredibly naturally to me. Which, of course, is slightly a worry. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: 06-21, 2015
Birthplace:
Die:
Occupation: Writer
Website:

Meg Rosoff (born 16 October 1956) is an American writer based in London, United Kingdom. She is best known for the novel How I Live Now (Puffin, 2004), which won the Guardian Prize, Printz Award, and Branford Boase Award and made the Whitbread Awards shortlist. Her second novel, Just in Case (Penguin, 2006) won the annual Carnegie Medal from the British librarians recognising the year's best children's book published in the U (wikipedia)