Natsuo Kirino - Quotes

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It's a very confusing experience living as a woman in Japan. If your husband is white-collar, the wife is blue. Even if you marry a person of status, the wife inevitably remains a rung below. ---->>>

One of my books, 'Rain Falling on My Face,' earned me the 39th Edogawa Ranpo prize. It's a very prestigious literary prize in Japan, mostly for mysteries and thrillers. ---->>>

In Japan, full-time homemakers have no economic power of their own, and they socially lead a faceless, anonymous existence. ---->>>

I started writing juvenile novels around 1985. I never really thought of it as a career, but more as a way to make a living. ---->>>

The thing I don't like about detective stories is looking for criminals. ---->>>

For research, I like to go to the location of the places in the novels. The first thing that I do is involve my senses: I notice the smells; I open the trash cans and look at what people have thrown away. ---->>>

I first thought about becoming a writer after the age of 30, which is rather late, I'd say. In my 20s, I wasn't especially good at anything, and I didn't have a lot of experiences. I was just a young woman without a good job. ---->>>

A crime is like a crack in reality, and it is the author's role to explore those cracks. As a writer, I like to see how they impinge on people. ---->>>

I'm happy to be told that I am beautiful, but I don't gain anything from that. ---->>>

I don't know if foreigners will take to my novels or not. It may be that my books appeal only to a particular gender or age group rather than convey a more universal appeal. ---->>>

'Out' was my real breakthrough, the novel that became a hit in Japan and sold a lot of books, so it was sort of an obvious choice for being the first book to be translated into English. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: Japanese
Born: 10-07, 1951
Birthplace:
Die:
Occupation: Novelist
Website:

Natsuo Kirino (桐野 夏生, Kirino Natsuo, born October 7, 1951 in Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture) is the pen name of Mariko Hashioka, a Japanese novelist and a leading figure in the recent boom of female writers of Japanese detective fiction.(wikipedia)