Norman Rockwell - Quotes

There are 27 quotes by Norman Rockwell at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Norman Rockwell from this hand-picked collection about life, time. Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

The secret to so many artists living so long is that every painting is a new adventure. So, you see, they're always looking ahead to something new and exciting. The secret is not to look back. ---->>>

Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is. All I know is that whatever type of work I do, I try to give it my very best. Art has been my life. ---->>>

When I go to farms or little towns, I am always surprised at the discontent I find. And New York, too often, has looked across the sea toward Europe. And all of us who turn our eyes away from what we have are missing life. ---->>>

I'm not going to be caught around here for any fool celebration. To hell with birthdays!

I'm not going to be caught around here for any fool celebration. To hell with birthdays!

Right from the beginning, I always strived to capture everything I saw as completely as possible. ---->>>

I'll never have enough time to paint all the pictures I'd like to. ---->>>

The remarks about my reaching the age of Social Security and coming to the end of the road, they jolted me. And that was good. Because I sure as hell had no intention of just sitting around for the rest of my life. So I'd whip out the paints and really go to it. ---->>>

No man with a conscience can just bat out illustrations. He's got to put all his talent and feeling into them! ---->>>

The '20s ended in an era of extravagance, sort of like the one we're in now. There was a big crash, but then the country picked itself up again, and we had some great years. Those were the days when American believed in itself. I was happy and proud to be painting it. ---->>>

Here in New England, the character is strong and unshakable. ---->>>

Everyone in those days expected that art students were wild, licentious characters. We didn't know how to be, but we sure were anxious to learn. ---->>>

I'm tired, but proud. ---->>>

My best efforts were some modern things that looked like very lousy Matisses. Thank God I had the sense to realize they were lousy, and leave Paris. ---->>>

Some folks think I painted Lincoln from life, but I haven't been around that long. Not quite. ---->>>

A face in the picture would bother me, so I'd rub it out with the turpentine and do it over. ---->>>

I'm the oldest antique in town. ---->>>

Things aren't much wilder now, I don't think, than they were back then. Of course I just read about all the goings-on now. Ha. ---->>>

I didn't know what to expect from a famous movie star; maybe that he'd be sort of stuck-up, you know. But not Gary Cooper. He horsed around so much... that I had a hard time painting him. ---->>>

I talk as I sketch, too, in order to keep their minds off what I'm doing so I'll get the most natural expression I can from them. Also, the talking helps to size up the subject's personality, so I can figure out better how to portray him. ---->>>

It was a pretty rough neighborhood where I grew up The really tough places were over around Third Avenue where it ran into the Harlem River, but we weren't far away. ---->>>

You must first spend some time getting your model to relax. Then you'll get a natural expression. ---->>>

I can take a lot of pats on the back. I love it when I get admiring letters from people. And, of course, I'd love it if the critics would notice me, too. ---->>>

It wouldn't be right for me to clown around when I'm painting a president. ---->>>

Eisenhower had about the most expressive face I ever painted, I guess. Just like an actor's. Very mobile. When he talked, he used all the facial muscles. And he had a great, wide mouth that I liked. When he smiled, it was just like the sun came out. ---->>>

I had a couple of million dollars' worth of... stock once. And now it's not worth much more than wallpaper. I guess I just wasn't born to be rich. ---->>>

I learned to draw everything except glamorous women. No matter how much I tried to make them look sexy, they always ended up looking silly... or like somebody's mother. ---->>>

Very interesting for an old duffer like me to try his hand at something new. If I don't do that once in a while, I might just turn into a fossil, you know! ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: February 3, 1894
Birthplace: New York City, New York
Die: 11-08, 1978
Occupation: Artist

Norman Perceval Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th-century American author, painter and illustrator. His works enjoy a broad popular appeal in the United States for its reflection of American culture. Rockwell is most famous for the cover illustrations of everyday life he created for The Saturday Evening Post magazine over nearly five decades (wikipedia)