Orville Wright - Quotes

There are 19 quotes by Orville Wright at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Orville Wright from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

The airplane stays up because it doesn't have the time to fall.

The airplane stays up because it doesn't have the time to fall.

If we all worked on the assumption that what is accepted as true is really true, there would be little hope of advance.

If we all worked on the assumption that what is accepted as true is really true, there would be little hope of advance.

With all the knowledge and skill acquired in thousands of flights in the last ten years, I would hardly think today of making my first flight on a strange machine in a twenty-seven mile wind, even if I knew that the machine had already been flown and was safe.

With all the knowledge and skill acquired in thousands of flights in the last ten years, I would hardly think today of making my first flight on a strange machine in a twenty-seven mile wind, even if I knew that the machine had already been flown and was safe.

When the machine had been fastened with a wire to the track, so that it could not start until released by the operator, and the motor had been run to make sure that it was in condition, we tossed a coin to decide who should have the first trial. Wilbur won. ---->>>

Isn't it astonishing that all these secrets have been preserved for so many years just so we could discover them! ---->>>

No flying machine will ever fly from New York to Paris. ---->>>

We were then satisfied that, with proper lubrication and better adjustments, a little more power could be expected. The completion of the motor according to drawing was, therefore, proceeded with at once. ---->>>

A sudden dart when a little over a hundred feet from the end of the track, or a little over 120 feet from the point at which it rose into the air, ended the flight. ---->>>

We left Dayton, September 23, and arrived at our camp at Kill Devil Hill on Friday, the 25th. ---->>>

When the motor was completed and tested, we found that it would develop 16 horse power for a few seconds, but that the power rapidly dropped till, at the end of a minute, it was only 12 horse power. ---->>>

The course of the flight up and down was exceedingly erratic, partly due to the irregularity of the air, and partly to lack of experience in handling this machine. The control of the front rudder was difficult on account of its being balanced too near the center. ---->>>

We laid the track on a smooth stretch of ground about one hundred feet north of the new building. ---->>>

In just six weeks from the time the design was started, we had the motor on the block testing its power.

In just six weeks from the time the design was started, we had the motor on the block testing its power.

With twelve horse power at our command, we considered that we could permit the weight of the machine with operator to rise to 750 or 800 pounds, and still have as much surplus power as we had originally allowed for in the first estimate of 550 pounds. ---->>>

No data on air propellers was available, but we had always understood that it was not a difficult matter to secure an efficiency of 50% with marine propellers. ---->>>

In our gliding experiments we had had a number of experiences in which we had landed upon one wing, but the crushing of the wing had absorbed the shock, so that we were not uneasy about the motor in case of a landing of that kind. ---->>>

One of the Life Saving men snapped the camera for us, taking a picture just as the machine had reached the end of the track and had risen to a height of about two feet. ---->>>

We estimated that we could make one of four cylinders with 4 inch bore and 4 inch stroke, weighing not over two hundred pounds, including all accessories. ---->>>

The ability to do this so quickly was largely due to the enthusiastic and efficient services of Mr. C.E. Taylor, who did all the machine work in our shop for the first as well as the succeeding experimental machines. ---->>>

Biography

Orville Wright profile (orville-wright.jpg)
Nationality: American
Born: August 19, 1871
Birthplace:
Die: 06-21, 2015
Occupation: Inventor
Website:

The Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871 – January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867 – May 30, 1912), were two American brothers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina (wikipedia)