Peter Capaldi - Quotes

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There is no such thing as too much swearing. Swearing is just a piece of linguistic mechanics. The words in-between are the clever ones.

There is no such thing as too much swearing. Swearing is just a piece of linguistic mechanics. The words in-between are the clever ones.

I'm sure if Shakespeare were alive today, he'd be doing classic guitar solos on YouTube. ---->>>

I don't remember 'Doctor Who' not being part of my life, and it became a part of growing up, along with The Beatles, National Health spectacles, and fog. And it runs deep. It's in my DNA. ---->>>

I destroyed all my geek stuff because I didn't want to be a geek, and I regret it to this day. Consumed in the geek bonfire of the vanities was a collection of autographs and letters from Peter Cushing, Spike Milligan and Frankie Howerd, the first Doctor Whos, actual astronauts, and many more. ---->>>

I'm not an extravagant man. The fact that I can have a coffee out whenever I want still makes me feel grateful. ---->>>

My childhood growing up in that part of Glasgow always sounds like some kind of sub-Catherine Cookson novel of earthy working-class immigrant life, which to some extent it was, but it wasn't really as colourful that. ---->>>

A little showbiz never hurt anyone.

A little showbiz never hurt anyone.

Every viewer who ever turned on 'Doctor Who' has taken him into his heart. He belongs to all of us. ---->>>

I'm pretty good for an old geek. ---->>>

A girl once came to my beery flat in Kensal Green, opened the blinds and cooked me breakfast. I married her. ---->>>

It's weathered many a storm, but the British film industry is, thankfully, still afloat. ---->>>

When I first came to London, I loved hanging around in cafes, smoking, scribbling, dreaming. It was life-affirming and fun. ---->>>

At 17 years old, STG took me under its wing and shared its resources and wisdom with me, even allowing me to take part in a show at the Edinburgh Festival. Without STG and the Ramshorn Theatre, I would not have found access to the world of drama that I later made my profession. ---->>>

I hated improvisation because in my early days as an actor, improvisation meant somebody had just come down from Oxford and they were doing a play above a pub in Kentish Town, and the biggest ego would win. ---->>>

STG and the Ramshorn Theatre are a vital part of Glasgow's rich cultural history. To abandon them now is to abandon not only our past, but our future. ---->>>

I don't like parties. There was never a party I was at where I didn't wish I was somewhere else. ---->>>

I don't mind being stereotyped as angry - it's good to have a job. ---->>>

I love people where, at the end of the day, they'll pick up a paintbrush and paint clouds. They can physically make things. ---->>>

I'm so lucky to have worked with Burt Lancaster, who I remember was one of the first people I'd heard swearing in a really interesting way. ---->>>

If I had gone to drama school, I wouldn't be sitting here now because it would have blanded me out; it would have just turned me into another actor. ---->>>

My adolescence was a kind of motorway pile-up. I wish I had known that one day the geek would inherit the Earth. ---->>>

Real heroes are all around us and uncelebrated.

Real heroes are all around us and uncelebrated.

Shouting at people keeps you alive, healthy, young, fresh. ---->>>

The best advice is to get on with it. I'm very prone to falling into depressions - not clinical, just 'can't be bothered.' It's such a waste of time. ---->>>

What you're doing is acting with yourself. Well, I'm my favourite actor, so in a way it's quite straightforward for me. ---->>>

The biggest thing I have realized was that you have to choose your collaborators very carefully, and that not everybody can like you. The process of filmmaking is so difficult, there's no point in doing it unless you can do it the way you want. ---->>>

What annoys me about it is that your fate is always in somebody else's hands. It's always up to somebody else to decide whether or not they want you in their show and so the majority of actors have to play out a waiting game. The constant fear is that it could all end tomorrow. ---->>>

Being asked to play 'The Doctor' is an amazing privilege. Like the Doctor himself I find myself in a state of utter terror and delight. I can't wait to get started. ---->>>

I was always admiring people who seemed to conduct themselves with ease in the world. Maybe that's a great gift to give your kids if you can do that. Because they can move through the world without neurosis, this anxiety about everything, which our own parents gave us. ---->>>

One of the very, very exciting things I have found here in L.A. is that no one talks to you about being Scottish. Whereas, if you are in London and you are trying to put films together and be a film-maker, there is a kind of unspoken sense that, if you are Scottish, you have something to overcome or else you cannot really do that project. ---->>>

The big reason that 'Doctor Who' is still with us is that every single viewer who ever turned in to watch this show, at any age, at any time in its history, took it into their heart - because 'Doctor Who' belongs to all of us. Everyone made 'Doctor Who.' ---->>>

I've been really terrible in a lot of things because I learned by making mistakes. That makes you a different kind of actor, because you have to figure out for yourself what you do. ---->>>

Hollywood producers aren't going to say, 'Get me that swearing, grey-haired, headless chicken. We need him for our new 'High School Musical' movie!' ---->>>

Believe it or not, one teacher used to call me a giant spastic for not being able to play football. ---->>>

'Doctor Who' belongs to all of us. Everybody makes 'Doctor Who.' ---->>>

I can't imagine I'll be the new George Clooney. That's not really in the cards. ---->>>

I can't imagine I'll be the new George Clooney. That's not really on the cards. ---->>>

I don't want to make a film to make a film. ---->>>

I hate restaurants that play music. You come out for a quiet meal, and you're supposed to put up with all this booming. Why? It's madness! ---->>>

I haven't played Doctor Who since I was 9 on the playground. ---->>>

I never really think of acting and directing as being separate; they are just different expressions of the same thing. ---->>>

I suppose I just like being arty. That's all. Arty. ---->>>

Recently, I dreamed that I returned home to find my wife had married Ray Winstone. They were kind and let me stay, but the whole thing was awkward. ---->>>

'Strictly Sinatra' became a compromise between me and the producers, and neither of us liked the results much. ---->>>

The Americans just have a great sort of wit about them. ---->>>

I don't want to find myself at the age of 60 waiting by the telephone for someone else to decide if I am capable of being in what might be a crummy TV production. ---->>>

What I've learnt being an actor is that you've got to be lucky. I got less lucky, and nobody was interested. If a part came up, it would be for the main corpse's friend's brother who was having problems with his marriage. ---->>>

Before 'Local Hero,' I'd been knocking about Glasgow in rock bands, drinking too much and generally being 21. My opinion of actors was that they were straight and boring, so you see, I was completely unprepared for being one. ---->>>

Crime is interesting. It's huge and fascinating, and it's what my business, TV and film, is largely based on. But the realities are tragic, and in crime drama you rarely see the pain of bereavement or any consequences. It's reduced to a chess game. ---->>>

Even though I am a lifelong 'Doctor Who' fan, I've not played him since I was nine. I downloaded old scripts and practised those in front of the mirror. ---->>>

I don't think I would have been great in the 17th century. I would have enjoyed the frocks, and certainly some of the food would have been appealing, but the disease and hygiene would have worried me. ---->>>

I went to art school in the days when it was what you did if you didn't want to be like everybody else. You wanted to be strange and different, and art school encouraged that. We hated the drama students - they were guys with pipes and cardigans. ---->>>

I'm not terribly well read. My wife forces books into my hands and insists I read them, which I'm grateful to her for. She made me read 'War and Peace.' The whole thing. It was amazing, but I had to hide it. You can't walk round reading 'War and Peace' - it's like you're in a comedy sketch and you think you're smart. ---->>>

Scottish men of a certain age have a black response to almost everything as a measure of how sophisticated they are. I have a very long fuse that eventually explodes after building up a nice head of steam, although it's only happened three times - usually at work when someone takes me for granted. ---->>>

The difference between movies and TV is that in TV you have to have a trauma every week, but that event may not be the biggest event in the characters' lives. ---->>>

The only time I've tried to make plans, the cosmic sledgehammer has intervened and something else has happened. You just have to wait and see what comes your way, so that's what I do. ---->>>

When I was a kid, I wrote to the BBC, and the producers sent me a huge package through the post with 'Doctor Who' scripts. I'd never even seen a script and couldn't believe that they actually wrote this stuff down. It sort of opened a door. ---->>>

When I was acting, I was always asking abut the mechanics of filmmaking. I decided I would learn what everyone on set was doing, so I would feel less threatened. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: Scottish
Born: 04-14, 1958
Birthplace: Glasgow, Scotland
Die:
Occupation: Actor
Website:

Peter Dougan Capaldi (born 14 April 1958) is a Scottish actor, writer and director, best known for playing the twelfth incarnation of the Doctor in the television series Doctor Who. His next most notable role is spin doctor Malcolm Tucker in The Thick of It, for which he has received four British Academy Television Award nominations, winning Best Male Comedy Performance in 2010 (wikipedia)