Philip Sidney - Quotes

There are 13 quotes by Philip Sidney at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Philip Sidney from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

Either I will find a way, or I will make one.

Either I will find a way, or I will make one.

A true knight is fuller of bravery in the midst, than in the beginning of danger. ---->>>

It is the nature of the strong heart, that like the palm tree it strives ever upwards when it is most burdened.

It is the nature of the strong heart, that like the palm tree it strives ever upwards when it is most burdened.

The only disadvantage of an honest heart is credulity. ---->>>

The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care.

The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care.

Our erected wit maketh us to know what perfection is. ---->>>

Indeed, the Roman laws allowed no person to be carried to the wars but he that was in the soldiers' roll. ---->>>

It is great happiness to be praised of them who are most praiseworthy. ---->>>

If you have so earth-creeping a mind that it cannot lift itself up to look to the sky of poetry... thus much curse I must send you, in the behalf of all poets, that while you live, you live in love, and never get favour for lacking skill of a sonnet; and, when you die, your memory die from the earth for want of an epitaph.

If you have so earth-creeping a mind that it cannot lift itself up to look to the sky of poetry... thus much curse I must send you, in the behalf of all poets, that while you live, you live in love, and never get favour for lacking skill of a sonnet; and, when you die, your memory die from the earth for want of an epitaph.

Plato found fault that the poets of his time filled the world with wrong opinions of the gods, making light tales of that unspotted essence, and therefore would not have the youth depraved with such opinions. ---->>>

Poesy must not be drawn by the ears: it must be gently led, or rather, it must lead, which was partly the cause that made the ancient learned affirm it was a divine, and no human skill, since all other knowledges lie ready for any that have strength of wit; a poet no industry can make, if his own genius be not carried into it.

Poesy must not be drawn by the ears: it must be gently led, or rather, it must lead, which was partly the cause that made the ancient learned affirm it was a divine, and no human skill, since all other knowledges lie ready for any that have strength of wit; a poet no industry can make, if his own genius be not carried into it.

For conclusion, I say the philosopher teacheth, but he teacheth obscurely, so as the learned only can understand him; that is to say, he teacheth them that are already taught. ---->>>

The poet nothing affirmeth and therefore never lieth. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: English
Born: November 30, 1554
Birthplace:
Die: October 17, 1586
Occupation: Soldier
Website:

Sir Philip Sidney (30 November 1554 – 17 October 1586) was an English poet, courtier, scholar, and soldier, who is remembered as one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age. His works include Astrophel and Stella, The Defence of Poesy (also known as The Defence of Poetry or An Apology for Poetry), and The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia (wikipedia)