Richard Louv - Quotes

There are 24 quotes by Richard Louv at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Richard Louv from this hand-picked collection about time, nature, future. Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

Time spent in nature is the most cost-effective and powerful way to counteract the burnout and sort of depression that we feel when we sit in front of a computer all day. ---->>>

We tend to block off many of our senses when we're staring at a screen. Nature time can literally bring us to our senses. ---->>>

It's easy to blame the nature-deficit disorder on the kids' or the parents' back, but they also need the help of urban planners, schools, libraries and other community agents to find nature that's accessible. ---->>>

As a species, we are most animated when our days and nights on Earth are touched by the natural world. We can find immeasurable joy in the birth of a child, a great work of art, or falling in love. ---->>>

No other youth group like the Scouts has trained so many future leaders while at the same time being a nature organization with its outdoor focus. ---->>>

By bringing nature into our lives, we invite humility. ---->>>

Leave part of the yard rough. Don't manicure everything. Small children in particular love to turn over rocks and find bugs, and give them some space to do that. Take your child fishing. Take your child on hikes. ---->>>

How can our kids really understand the moral complexities of being alive if they are not allowed to engage in those complexities outdoors? ---->>>

Kids are absolutely starved for positive adult contact. ---->>>

Now, more than ever, we need nature as a balancing agent. ---->>>

These days, unplugged places are getting hard to find. ---->>>

I do not trust technology. I mean, I don't think we're in any danger of kids, you know, doing without video games in the future, but I am saying that their lives are largely out of balance. ---->>>

If war occurs, that positive adult contact in every shape is needed more than ever. It will be a matter of emotional life and death. There's not a handy one-minute way of talking to your kid about war.

If war occurs, that positive adult contact in every shape is needed more than ever. It will be a matter of emotional life and death. There's not a handy one-minute way of talking to your kid about war.

We are telling our kids that nature is in the past and it probably doesn't count anymore, the future is in electronics, the boogeyman is in the woods, and playing outdoors is probably illicit and possibly illegal. ---->>>

When you're sitting in front of a screen, you're not using all of your senses at the same time. Nowhere than in nature do kids use their senses in such a stimulated way. ---->>>

There's a generation now that didn't grow up in nature. Some of these adults are parents and they know that nature is good for their kids but they don't know where to start. ---->>>

Green exercise improves psychological health. ---->>>

Natural playgrounds may decrease bullying. ---->>>

Other species help children develop empathy. ---->>>

Kids and adults pay a price for too much tech, and it's not wholesale. ---->>>

Kids are plugged into some sort of electronic medium 44 hours per week. ---->>>

Mothers tend to be more direct. Fathers talk to other fathers about their kids more metaphorically. It's a different way of communication. ---->>>

A lot of people think they need to give up nature to become adults but that's not true. However, you have to be careful how you describe and define 'nature.' ---->>>

Our kids are actually doing what we told them to do when they sit in front of that TV all day or in front of that computer game all day. The society is telling kids unconsciously that nature's in the past. It really doesn't count anymore, that the future is in electronics, and besides, the bogeyman is in the woods. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: American
Born: 06-21, 2015
Birthplace:
Die:
Occupation: Author
Website:

Richard Louv (born 1949) is an American nonfiction author and journalist. He is best known for his seventh book, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder (first published in 2005 by Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill), which investigates the relationship of children and the natural world in current and historical contexts (wikipedia)