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Steve Coogan - Quotes

There are 54 quotes by Steve Coogan at 95quotes.com. Find your favorite quotations and top quotes by Steve Coogan from this hand-picked collection . Feel free to share these quotes and sayings on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr & Twitter or any of your favorite social networking sites.

If you start to disrespect the character you're playing, or play it too much for laughs, that can work for a sketch, it will sell some gags, but it's all technique. It's like watching a juggler - you can be impressed by it, but it's not going to touch you in any way.

If you start to disrespect the character you're playing, or play it too much for laughs, that can work for a sketch, it will sell some gags, but it's all technique. It's like watching a juggler - you can be impressed by it, but it's not going to touch you in any way.

If you chase something too desperately, it eludes you. ---->>>

The trick is always to write in pairs because if at least two people find it funny, you've immediately halved the odds of it not being funny. ---->>>

I've always been drawn to discomfort and that limbo of unease you get between comedy and tragedy. Making people laugh one moment and the next making them feel really uncomfortable. ---->>>

Even great people are always slightly disappointing, which is generally what makes them interesting. ---->>>

I've always been drawn to discomfort and that limbo of unease you get between comedy and tragedy. ---->>>

If you do something very successful, you will then be defined by it. ---->>>

If you are a great dramatic actor then you often don't know if people are enjoying your stuff at all because they are sitting there in silence. But with comedy it's a simple premise. If it's funny, people laugh. If it's not, they don't. ---->>>

I don't think I'm kind of universally known. I think in the indie world I'm probably better known than in some mainstream Hollywood terms. ---->>>

The tabloids operate in an amoral parallel universe where the bottom line is selling newspapers.

The tabloids operate in an amoral parallel universe where the bottom line is selling newspapers.

Yeah, all drama teachers are very effusive, very demonstrative, very emotionally open, very big, and gesticulate a lot, and are very physical. ---->>>

When I was a student I was very, very ambitious, completely immersed in my comedy career. I never had that period of reckless hedonism that you should get out of your system in your youth. ---->>>

I'm a huge fan of Jack Lemmon, he was someone who managed to tread that line between comedy and tragedy and sometimes give very big performances, but they were never over-demonstrative and they were never not based on a kind of real truthful human being. ---->>>

When I see friends from school I think they've all grown old and I've stayed the same. ---->>>

Me, myself, personally, I like to keep myself private. I have never said I am a paragon of virtue, a model of morality. I simply do what I do. ---->>>

There is a strong ethical dimension to the best comedy. Not only does it avoid reinforcing prejudices, it actively challenges them. ---->>>

Hacking into a victim of crime's phone is a sort of poetically elegant manifestation of a modus operandi the tabloids have. ---->>>

Big comedy is good, I like things that are big, but good comedy has to be truthful I think and has to reflect some sort of reality. ---->>>

I am of the very last generation who didn't have computers at school. As we grow old we'll become something of an aberration. ---->>>

I did not become successful in my work through embracing or engaging in celebrity culture. I never signed away my privacy in exchange for success. ---->>>

I find impressionists slightly annoying, really. ---->>>

I happen to have a public profile. Ditto newspaper editors. It's a result of what I do, not an end. ---->>>

If the person who can effectively sanction ill-conceived wars can play the electric guitar, which is a symbol of rebellion, then that whole worldview becomes confused. ---->>>

Going to a grammar school, you mixed with all sorts of different types and I used to listen to how they talked. When I did my imitations, I could sound like someone really rough, or I could sound like a cabinet minister. ---->>>

Most of all I don't want to be bored. That's why I'd rather do something that has some sort of ambition, that risks failing, rather than make safer, more comfortable choices. ---->>>

The best feeling in the world is performing in front of a live audience who like what you're doing. I can understand why people become dictators just because of the thrill they get making the speeches. ---->>>

I don't think there's anything outside what comedy can address. ---->>>

If you are a great dramatic actor then you often don't know if people are enjoying your stuff at all because they are sitting there in silence. ---->>>

People regurgitate the same old cliches and it becomes like a photocopy of a photocopy of something that's vaguely interesting. ---->>>

There's something quite joyful about doing comedy which doesn't really need much analysis. I'm not elitist. I like to do crowd-pleasing stuff which is a bit smart, but is just about belly laughs. ---->>>

When you see a crowd of people jumping up and down at a pop concert, all gloriously in the moment, I don't think you'll ever see a comedian there. They'll all be standing at the sides, looking at how it all fits together. ---->>>

Comedy is unique in the sense that laughter is a palpable noise that everyone makes. ---->>>

I want my work to be judged, not me. ---->>>

Actors say they do their own stunts for the integrity of the film but I did them because they looked like a lot of fun. ---->>>

As soon as I see period costume, I turn off. It's like hearing drama on Radio 4. ---->>>

But with comedy it's a simple premise. If it's funny, people laugh. If it's not, they don't. ---->>>

I don't go to premieres, unless I'm contractually bound to. ---->>>

I don't like new bands. I don't want to be one of those pathetic old men in their forties who knows exactly what 18-year-olds are into. ---->>>

I have never wanted to be famous, as such - fame is a by-product. ---->>>

I like the transience of Klimt paintings. ---->>>

I think it's always funny when you see kids do Shakespeare. ---->>>

I try to not make safe choices, but I also like to do stuff which is interesting and is sort of exciting in some way and accessible. ---->>>

I used to do stuff at college. I could do voices. I could make some people laugh. I wasn't the class clown, but I knew I had this skill. ---->>>

I wasn't a naturally confident, extravert, outgoing person. ---->>>

I'm an entertainer. I don't go round saying I'm a paragon of virtue, so that is clearly not in the public interest. ---->>>

My father worked for IBM. My mother raised us kids. There were six of us, and a couple of extra foster kids at any given time. ---->>>

The great thing is that the funny side of getting old is fuel for my comedy. ---->>>

What I don't like is dance music or hip hop or any of that sort of thing. ---->>>

Actually, bizarrely, in America, I get more appreciation from the odd, unusual stuff I've done, almost because I'm not, if you like, famous in America as I am in England. ---->>>

I always find it easier to portray myself as being unlikeable and idiotic; to actually play a character that is likeable and engages the audience is far more difficult. It's a more subtle kind of challenge. ---->>>

I don't like comedy that I think is bad comedy, where people are trying to be sick for the sake of it, where there's no intellectual point behind it. I like stuff that's got an underlying point of view. ---->>>

I'm just attracted to playing people who are ostensible unlikable. That's not to say that there's something in there that makes you care. It might be that you just find them so awful that you just can't stop watching, like a car crash. ---->>>

London audiences are tricky, too. They don't laugh as much as the Northern audiences because, and I hate to say this, they are a bit cleverer normally, and they are picking up on all the little details and listening more carefully. ---->>>

When you tour you become more intimate with your audience. It's like I need reassurance that they like me or at least find me relevant. And that I can still do it. ---->>>

Biography

Nationality: British
Born: 10-14, 1965
Birthplace: in Middleton, Rochdale, Greater Manchester, The United Kingdom
Die:
Occupation: Comedian
Website:

Stephen John Coogan (born 14 October 1965) is an English actor, stand-up comedian, impressionist, screenwriter, and producer. He began his career in the 1980s, working as a voice artist on the satirical puppet show Spitting Image and providing voiceovers for television advertisements. In the early 1990s, he began creating original comic characters, leading him to win the Perrier Award at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe (wikipedia)